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James Ashby's fellow conspirator, Karen Doane (pictured above) is now claiming Peter Slipper discriminated against her whilst she was a staffer in his office. When will it ever end?

Just when Peter Slipper may have thought it was safe to go outside again, Ashbygate co-conspirator Karen Doane has resurfaced to screw the knife again. The Ashbygate Trust reports.

SO, KAREN L DOANE HAS SURFACED.

Finally.

About time. She has a lot of questions to answer.

Her elusive powers have either been nonpareil or she’s had serious protection. Well-covered tracks.

But now, here she is – under the familiar auspices of Harmers Workplace Lawyers – asking the Federal Court this week to consider allegations Peter Slipper has breached her human rights as an employee.

The Trust applied for, paid for and received the unrestricted parts of the claim from the Court this week and can reveal the key parts it here.

Firstly, Doane is using provisions of Australian human rights law to allege Peter Slipper unlawfully discriminated against her while she was a staffer in his employment:

The Trust is chuffed and can’t wait for the court date of April 1 — that's right, April Fool's Day.

Irony abounds in the Ashbygate saga.

Anyway, the Trust applied to the Federal Court and – after the payment of a small sum – we were granted and received the first five pages of Karen's claim. We are trying to get the rest.

So, let's take a look at what we've received so far:

But what does this mean?

Well, Section 14(2)(a) & (b) of the Sexual Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth) says:

(2)  It is unlawful for an employer to discriminate against an employee on the ground of the employee's sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, intersex status, marital or relationship status, pregnancy or potential pregnancy, breastfeeding or family responsibilities:

(a)  in the terms or conditions of employment that the employer affords the employee;

(b)  by denying the employee access, or limiting the employee's access, to opportunities for promotion, transfer or training, or to any other benefits associated with employment...

Sections 15(1) (b) of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth) says it is unlawful for an employer or an employer's agent:

(b)  to refuse or fail to offer or afford a second person the same terms of employment, conditions of work and opportunities for training and promotion as are made available for other persons having the same qualifications and employed in the same circumstances on work of the same description...

Section 15(2)(a) & (b) of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) states:

(2)  It is unlawful for an employer or a person acting or purporting to act on behalf of an employer to discriminate against an employee on the ground of the employee's disability:

(a)  in the terms or conditions of employment that the employer affords the employee; or

 (b)  by denying the employee access, or limiting the employee's access, to opportunities for promotion, transfer or training, or to any other benefits associated with employment...

Peter Slipper by John Graham (The originals of John Graham's art, featured in this piece as well as throughout IA, are available for purchase by emailing editor@independentaustralia.net.)

Ashbygate aficionados will draw their own conclusions regarding the veracity or otherwise of these claims.

We are not about to second-guess the court, but – wow – are we excited about the prospect of Karen spelling out her case.

Let’s hope no-one ties her shoelaces together.

Catch up on the full Ashbygate saga on IA here. Became a member of the Ashbygate Trust here.

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