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The most influential and controversial judge in a generation dies (Image by fivethirtyeight.com)

Bob Ellis laments the damage wrought by newly deceased U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

I HAD NOT thought Antonin Scalia might outlive me until yesterday, but I did then, and I rejoiced at his death belatedly, though I knew the damage he had done was enormous and irreparable.

He caused the deaths of about 10 million people and hastened the end of the Earth.

He did this by stopping the vote count in 2000 and electing, illegally, George W. Bush as President, although he had scored four million fewer votes than the numerical winner, Al Gore, and allowed the disfranchisement, among Floridians, of blacks on the orders of its governor, "Jeb" Bush.

He should have recused himself from the recount because he was a duck-hunting friend of Dick Cheney, but he chose instead to subvert the American Constitution, cause the war in Iraq, the War on Terror and to extend to 30 years the legal battle against Roe V Wade. Had his friend Roberts not gone against him, there would have been no Obamacare. Had Teddy Kennedy not died three months too soon there would have been a Public Option.

Scalia was one of those figures who, like J. Edgar Hoover, seem destined to ruin America and "give it a red-hot go".

His absence now seems as vast and significant as that of Hoover but, of course, it is larger than that. Under President Al Gore there would have been 10 million fewer dead now, 50 million more born, no Syrian War and refugee crisis and a settlement, perhaps, in Israel.

One hesitates to use the word "evil", but he came close.

Obama will appoint in his stead a young judge who will bring, 50 years late, a measure of civilisation to an America already barbarised and, for 300 years, enslaved.

It will either be too late, or not.

And we will see what we shall see.

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